Arts and Social Justice

June 7, 2021 by Carmen Graciela Díaz

United States Artists and the Rainin Foundation hosted a virtual gathering of the inaugural Rainin Fellows: Margo Hall, Rodrigo Reyes, Amara Tabor-Smith, and Saqib Keval with Jocelyn Jackson of the People’s Kitchen Collective.

Read More...
May 18, 2021 by Carmen Graciela Díaz

Inside Philanthropy checks in with leaders in the arts funding sector to see how the space has changed in response to calls to fight systemic racism and what remains to be done.

Read More...
April 15, 2021 by admin

March 2021, 121 pages. Grantmakers in the Arts, 522 Courtlandt Avenue, 1st Floor, Bronx, NY 10451. (929) 452-3740. https://art.coop/.

Read More...
April 6, 2021 by admin

Setting the Stage

With a population of over 2.3 million and one-in-four residents being foreign-born, Houston is the most ethnically diverse metro area in the nation. The city’s arts programs and cultural offerings are robust in number and breadth, and its vibrancy unfolds along the numerous bayous and highways. Most years see 11 to 16 million visitors traveling to the city for arts and cultural events. Houston’s nonprofit arts and culture sector, a $1.1 billion industry, employs more than 25,000 people.

Read More...
April 6, 2021 by admin

Millennials live differently than previous generations of Americans. We stay single longer. More of us have student debt and are self-employed, freelancers, and members of the growing gig economy. According to Randstad’s research on the workplace, more than half of Americans will be self-employed by 2025. More than 40% of gig workers will be millennials, a figure that will likely grow given the size of the generation and its youth. Millennials are the largest demographic in American history. We are the future.

Read More...
April 6, 2021 by admin

To better support Black artists and cultural communities, arts philanthropy should increase its focus on stability and resilience in creative practice. Covid has fully revealed its long-standing fragility, leaving 63% of all artists unemployed and 66% unable to access the infrastructure necessary for their work.1

Read More...
April 6, 2021 by admin

In William Faulkner’s novel, As I Lay Dying, a young character by the name of Vardaman is allowed to believe that his “mother is a fish,” because no one takes the time to tell him that his mother is dead. Instead he associates what he witnesses with the reality he understands within a highly dysfunctional family. In the novel, he repeats, “fish. fish. fish.” Similarly, I would offer that we are currently operating in a highly dysfunctional philanthropic family. I believe in the potential of our work.

Read More...
March 26, 2021 by Carmen Graciela Díaz

A panel hosted in May 2020 by the Freelance Artist Resource Collective on building solidarity in and with Asian American & Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities featured important conversations that deserve reliving in the midst of acts of violence against Asian American communities.

Read More...
March 5, 2021 by Carmen Graciela Díaz

In a recent article in Alliance Magazine, Nicolette Naylor and David Sampson examine legal action as a key tool for interrogating and challenging power and advancing justice.

Read More...
March 1, 2021 by Carmen Graciela Díaz

Grace Nicolette, vice president, Programming and External Relations of the Center for Effective Philanthropy, wrote recently that her observation from working in philanthropy for more than 15 years "is that Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are often left out of conversations around race, either purposefully or by neglect."

Read More...